Wednesday, September 26, 2012

The iPhone 5 is Actually Clocked at 1.3GHz

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Primate Labs' John Poole has released a new version of Geekbench for iPhone that features a dramatically improved processor frequency detection algorithm, reports Engadget.

The new algorithm "consistently reports the A6's frequency as 1.3GHz." Poole confirmed to Engadget that "earlier versions of Geekbench had trouble determining the A6's frequency, which lead to people claiming the A6's frequency as 1.0GHz as it was the most common value Geekbench reported."

The site asked him if the A6 chip was capable of dynamically overclocking to which Poole answered, "I don't believe the A6 has any form of processor boost. In our testing, we found the 1.3GHz was constant regardless of whether one core or both cores were busy."


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- Posted using my iPhone 4

Boot Test iPhone 2G vs. 3G vs. 3GS vs. 4 vs. 4S vs. 5 Video

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We've posted a test comparing how long it takes the iPhone 2G, iPhone 3G, iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, and iPhone 5 to boot.

Every device was freshly restored to the highest firmware version support by the device.

Take a look below...




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- Posted using my iPhone 4

Low Light Shootout: iPhone 5 vs. Lumia 920 vs. One X vs. Galaxy S III Photos

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The iPhone 5, Lumia 920, Nokia 808, HTC One X and Galaxy S III go head to head in an Engadget low light shootout.

It looks like Nokia's controversial marketing move, which involved using pro DSLRs to "simulate" low-light shooting, was even less necessary that the smartphone maker may have thought. During our visit to the company's Tampere, Finland research and development complex, we were given access to a comprehensive testing suite, enabling us to shoot with the Lumia 920 and a handful of competing products in a controlled lighting environment. Technicians dimmed the lights and let us snap a static scene with each handset at just 5 lux -- a level on par with what you may expect on a dimly lit city street in the middle of the night. The 920 took the cake, without question, but the iPhone didn't fare too poorly itself, snatching up nearly as much light as the Nokia device. The 808 PureView also performed quite well, but the HTC One X and Samsung Galaxy S III yielded unusable results.

For a far more detailed comparison of each device's performance, hit this link...




You can follow Limerain on TwitterFacebook, or RSS to be notified of any updates.

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 Send us a story or tip @ TipsForLimerain.com@gmail.com and follow our pages for the latest limera1n, rubyra1n, and all tech stories, follow us on Twitter at @iphonepixelpost or @limerain_com
And like our Facebook page www.iPodSets.com
- Posted using my iPhone 4