Wednesday, August 31, 2011

New low-cost, subscription-based personal navigation app from Garmin goes live on the App Store

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There is no shortage of GPS-enabled apps on Apple’s mobile devices. Unfortunately, quality programs usually cost north of fifty bucks. For example, Garmin’s StreetPilot, an excellent navigation app for iOS gadgets, is a $60 download - you can get refurbished low-end handheld GPS devices for that sum. Figuring out the realities, Garmin released a brand new, low-cost, subscription based personal navigation iOS app, the Garmin StreetPilot onDemand.

The program works with iPhones as well as WiFi and 3G models of iPad and costs just 99 cents a month to use. It includes public transit information for 31 metropolitan areas, pretty 3D graphics, standard walking, driving and public transportation directions, spoken turb-by-turn directions and more.

You can download Garmin StreetPilot onDemand from the App Store and let iTunes charge your credit card 99 cents each month or opt for a premium subscription that comes with advanced features. More on that, plus three more screenshots below.

The premium subscription gets you voice-guided navigation with automatic off-route recalculation, real-time traffic, photoReal junction view, lane guidance, speed limits and more.

The premium upgrade costs three bucks a month, or thirty bucks annually, but they’re currently running a launch promotion where an annual premium subscription costs twenty bucks (a $10 saving), valid until September 14.










*thanks 9to5mac*

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- Posted using my iPhone 4

Windows Explorer 8: What happens when you can’t say no

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Techcrunch points us to this amusing Microsoft blog post articulating the decision to put just about every possible item in the future Windows Explorer 8 bar.

This is clearly an example of trying to put everything somewhere with no regard for clutter or usability or design. It is hard to imagine a better example of why Apple’s ability to say no to extraneous features is better for usage.

*thanks 9to5mac*

Send us a story or tip @ TipsForLimerain.com@gmail.com and follow our pages for the latest limera1n, rubyra1n, and all tech stories, follow us on Twitter at @iphonepixelpost or @limerain_com
And like our Facebook page www.iPodSets.com
- Posted using my iPhone 4